becuzbacon:

inducedfallacies:

plightoferasmus:

ecklecticsoul:

African girls step in the club like…

 x

still one of my favorite dance videos to watch

What’s the video called?!

That last one tho

"Stop worrying about your identity and concern yourself with the people you care about, ideas that matter to you, beliefs you can stand by, tickets you can run on. Intelligent humans make those choices with their brain and hearts and they make them alone. The world does not deliver meaning to you. You have to make it meaningful…and decide what you want and need and must do. It’s a tough, unimaginably lonely and complicated way to be in the world. But that’s the deal: you have to live; you can’t live by slogans, dead ideas, clichés, or national flags. Finding an identity is easy. It’s the easy way out."

Zadie Smith, On Beauty  (via aminaabramovic)

(Source: literaryjukebox.brainpickings.org)

dynamicafrica:

In honor of International Literacy Day, I compiled a list of some of my favourite books written by African authors (with the exception of the book about Fela). There are many books I could’ve added to this post but these were the first that came to mind.

There’s no order to this list and each comes highly recommended as they, in some way, changed me for the better. If I had to pick a favourite it would undoubtedly be Zimbabwean writer Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions simply because it was the first book I read in which I related so deeply to several of the characters - and still do. From Nyasha’s struggle with depression and being caught between two cultures she feels alienated by, to Tambu’s hunger for a world beyond her circumstances. Ugandan author Okot p’Bitek’s Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol comes in a close second, it’s just about as cheeky and blunt as I am in some parts and, perhaps a little out of narcissism, is why I enjoyed it.

Between these 18 books you’ll find everything from the personal to the political, and everything in-between. There’s love, there’s romance, there’s struggle, there’s strife, there’s beauty and there’s ugly too. No story is as simple as their titles may suggest, just read Camara Laye’s L’enfant Noir (The African Child) that explores the author’s early childhood in Guinea under French colonisation, or South African writer Sol Plaatjie’s historical novel Mhudi written in 1919 that placed a woman at the center of a story that deals with survival, displacement and early European colonisation in South Africa.

For anyone interested in reading these books, I found some of them available online (not all are complete):

Filmmaker Ava Duvernay and Artist Kara Walker In Conversation

(Source: jessehimself)

anotherboheminan:

(via HomeStories | Casa Mariangela & Roberto)

anotherboheminan:

(via HomeStories | Casa Mariangela & Roberto)

aadatart:

Above: Abdoulaye Konaté, “Composition de Plumes”, 2012. Abdoulaye was born in Mali in 1959
Discover more artists in the post, 1-54 African Art Fair, A Visual Grid of Art by the 111 Artists Exhibiting
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African & Afro-Diasporan Art TalksJoin us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP

aadatart:

Above: Abdoulaye Konaté, “Composition de Plumes”, 2012. Abdoulaye was born in Mali in 1959

Discover more artists in the post, 1-54 African Art Fair, A Visual Grid of Art by the 111 Artists Exhibiting

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African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP

aadatart:

Above: Karo Akpokiere, “Nigerian Mystic Visa Temple”, 2013. Karo was born in Lagos, Nigeria in 1981
Discover more artists in the post, 1-54 African Art Fair, A Visual Grid of Art by the 111 Artists Exhibiting
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African & Afro-Diasporan Art TalksJoin us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP

aadatart:

Above: Karo Akpokiere, “Nigerian Mystic Visa Temple”, 2013. Karo was born in Lagos, Nigeria in 1981

Discover more artists in the post, 1-54 African Art Fair, A Visual Grid of Art by the 111 Artists Exhibiting

-

African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP

aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014

WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.

Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 

-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks

Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 

jessehimself:

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye 

gustavklimt-art:

The Tall Poplar Trees II, 1900
Gustav Klimt

gustavklimt-art:

The Tall Poplar Trees II, 1900

Gustav Klimt